Tags

, ,

Here’s the thing about most reviewers who take on Mumford & Sons’ new album “Babel.” You’re either the ultra-hip, irreligious type who is totally annoyed by all the Jesus-y stuff that Marcus Mumford writes about. You want the band to just admit they’re a Christian band and get on with it.

Or, if you’re not a total idiot and you recognize that pop music — particularly that of the folky variety  — has long drawn on religious themes, you think that Mumford is just not doing it right.Here’s the thing about most reviewers who take on Mumford & Sons’ new album “Babel.” You’re either the ultra-hip, irreligious type who is totally annoyed by all the Jesus-y stuff that Marcus Mumford writes about. You want the band to just admit they’re a Christian band and get on with it.

Or, if you’re not a total idiot and you recognize that pop music — particularly that of the folky variety  — has long drawn on religious themes, you think that Mumford is just not doing it right.Here’s the thing about most reviewers who take on Mumford & Sons’ new album “Babel.” You’re either the ultra-hip, irreligious type who is totally annoyed by all the Jesus-y stuff that Marcus Mumford writes about. You want the band to just admit they’re a Christian band and get on with it.

Or, if you’re not a total idiot and you recognize that pop music — particularly that of the folky variety  — has long drawn on religious themes, you think that Mumford is just not doing it right. – Jonathan D. Fitzgerald

Finally a balances article…read the rest here.

There is SO much hype around Mumford and Sons new album  Babel in the last two weeks. Its is now the fastest selling album of 2012 in the UK and US.

I am just researching with the help of Sophie how to approach this, respecting the music as ‘art’ but equally recognising all the Christian theological references/ the band personal background.

One to think about over the weekend…..

Advertisements